Friday, June 04, 2010

Carnival of Genealogy, 94th Edition

Welcome to the June 4, 2010 edition of the Carnival of Genealogy. The topic for this edition is: the changing roles of women. We all know that women's roles have changed over the centuries but have you stopped to think about how and when women's roles have changed within your own family? The participants in this edition of the COG certainly have! I invite you to come meet the women who changed the course of our lives with their pioneering spirit and willingness to go where no woman had gone before. These are the women of our families who changed our histories.

Pour yourself an ice cold Arnold Palmer and come join us! The Carnival is back in town!

Margie Rennick presents Why I Admire My Great Grandmother posted at Ancestor Chase, saying, "A tribute to my great grandmother on Mother's Day. Her story explains why I admire her and how the lives of women have changed over time." Margie, after reading about Katherine, I admire her too! Margie is right. Katherine's story is a perfect example of how few choices were available to women "in the old days". Yet Katherine was able to persevere and raise her children on her own. She's truly a remarkable woman. Thank you for sharing her with us! 

Dorene Paul presents Aunt Bertie was a Police Officer, and Co-Owned a Business posted at Graveyard Rabbit of Sandusky Bay, saying, "Dorene from Ohio's Aunt Bertie was a part time police officer and she also co-owned and operated a restaurant." What a delightful story Dorene! It's so nice to hear of women who were pioneering new roles in their communities. The 1960s was a time of transition for women and Bertie is a perfect example. She was able to handle the traditional roles of wife and mother along with the less traditional business owner and Police Officer. She was truly the "total package". Thanks for sharing her with us!

Jasia presents The Changing Roles of Women in the Lipa and Mizera Families posted at Creative Gene. I take a long look back at the roles of the women in my family from the 13th Century to the present. It is just amazing to me to think about how the roles of the women in my family have changed over the years... from peasant farmer's wife, to college educated business owning wife and mother, and lots in between. 

Judy Cole presents Sara and Betsey posted at The Genealogy Gals, saying, "This is the story of my daughter who has an unusual occupation and her role model, Betsey Miller. I think you will find Betsey's story both amazing and inspiring". Judy shares Betsey's amazing and inspirational story very eloquently. No wonder Betsey was your daughter's role model! Wonderful story, thanks for sharing it with us!

Kim Eisman presents The Changing Roles of Women in My Family posted at Ancestors of mine from Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky & beyond. Kim tells of several women in her family who broke with tradition, some by choice and some by necessity. All are stellar examples of women who worked as needed to support themselves and their families. What a great tribute, Kim. Loved the 5-legged table story! You make me want to meet them all!

Charles Hansen presents Carnival of Genealogy Working Women posted at Mikkel's Hus, saying, "My mom was a working mom while most moms were stay at home moms. She was able to work at home and make a good living." Thank you for sharing the story of your mom's work world with us Charles! She was no doubt capable and productive... an entrepreneur with a home office before it was "cool" to have a home office. That makes her a woman ahead of her time, doesn't it?

Nancy Messier presents Student Nurse, Registered Nurse posted at My Ancestors and Me, saying, "Audrey was the first among her mother and known foremothers to acquire formal education beyond high school. Read brief glimpses of a student nurse's training and view memorabilia and some of her scrapbook pages." Nancy, you have done your mother proud! This is a wonderful overview of Audrey's education and nurse's training put into perspective. It is so important to keep perspective in mind when looking back at our ancestor's lives. Nancy does a nice job of speculating on what might have motivated and inspired her mother as well as what she may have regretted. Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful! Thanks for sharing her with us!

Susan presents Orphaned and Widowed, Part I posted at Nolichucky Roots, saying, "A newbie blogger, I hesitated before entering this, especially since it's not a new post, but this two part article I wrote about one great-great-grandmother's life in 19th c. Virginia does illustrate how constrained their lives were even within domestic confines. I still shake my head at how little control she had over her home and children following her husband's death." Susan shares with us the story of Margaret Meredith Palmer who lived a traditional woman's role until the death of her husband. Family letters shed great insight into the challenges, fears, and reality that Marget faced as a single mother. Even though she married a man of means and those means were left to her and her children after his death, life was anything but easy for her. It was a man's world back then and women were not granted the same rights and privileges. Thanks for sharing Margaret with us, Susan! A very moving story!



~*~*~*Feature Article *~*~*~

Cynthia Shenette presents Meditation: The Strength of Ordinary Women posted at Heritage Zen:, saying, "This article really wrote itself. I started writing about my female ancestors in general, but four women stood out for this particular topic. I admire their strength and dignity in facing life's challenges. Thankfully times have changed, women's roles have changed, and my life is better because of it." Terrific tribute from Cynthia! I could really feel the admiration, sympathy, and respect in her words. I really like the way she compared and contrasted the lives of her female ancestors with her own life. Very well done. And the way she listed the people mentioned and her sources... really neat and professional. Thank you for sharing your tribute, Cynthia. I know your female ancestors would be proud!


Please join me in congratulating Cynthia Shenette for being the Featured Author of the 94th Edition of the Carnival of Genealogy!


That concludes this edition of the Carnival of Genealogy. I hope you enjoyed meeting this terrific group of women as much as I did! A big thank you to all who participated. I truly enjoyed your stories and the women of your families!


Call for Submissions! The topic for the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy will be: The Annual Swimsuit Edition! Yes folks, it's that time again... time to look over your photo collection of bathing beauties and select one to share. Bring us your pin-up girls, guys in Speedos, or kids building sand castles. Summer is here and it's time to show us how your family members have enjoyed the water and the summertime heat! The deadline for submissions is July 1st. Thirty submissions will be accepted. 

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using our carnival submission form. Please use a descriptive phrase in the title of any articles you plan to submit and/or write a brief description/introduction to your articles in the "comment" box of the blog carnival submission form. This will give readers an idea of what you've written about and hopefully interest them in clicking on your link. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

Thanks for the poster, 
fM!








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3 comments:

  1. I hate to gush, but gush I must. Thank you for selecting me as featured author for the 94th Carnival of Genealogy! As a newbie, I am truly honored. Up until now, my experience with creative writing has consisted mainly of writing annual reports, meeting minutes, and the like. You can only be so "creative" with those before you get into trouble...

    The topic, the changing roles of women, really spoke to me. I truly admire my subjects--Ewa, Jozefa, Maryanna, and Celina--and am glad that came through in my writing.

    Thank you again, and while it's a little early in the day for an Arnold Palmer, I think I'll enjoy my coffee as I read about the other wonderful women highlighted in this month's carnival.

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  2. A wonderful selection of stories, enjoyed reading them all. It seems all of our female ancestors were special, strong, and courageous. Doesn't matter what the occupation or social status, each helped get women to where we are today.

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  3. thank you for your very kind remarks! i'm always happy to hear from my readers.

    cynthia, you did a marvelous job with your article. i was very impressed , and i've read a lot of c o g articles! keep up the good work and please continue to participate in the c o g :-)

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